Blog

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The Blog is Back! April 2020

Due to time and volunteer pressures, our Blog has been idle for quite a while. However, while in the current circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 virus we are unable to all meet in person, we have decided to share some of our members’ recent work here.



Show and Tell 11 May 2020

Members are continuing to keep busy, and here is some of their latest work.

See the captions for details. I’m particularly enjoying members’ comments about their work, and Anne D, I’m with you on both the trials of beading, and the “need” for online shopping!

The final projects looking lovely in Agnes’s hallway

Anne D has completed ‘Daisy Meadow’ which is the final project she did in Jenny Adin-Christie’s whitework class during a tour of the UK
Anne D has also finished ‘Paisley Garden’ from Simplee Designs, which is a UFO finally completed after putting off the beading for quite a while. From Anne: “I did not enjoy the beading and am now over beading for life. Chasing tiny beads around a container, putting them onto a needle and trying desperately to get them to look right on the fabric is not my scene.
I have just about finished the preparation for the Trapunto kit from Annie London that I bought from the Great Australian Craft Show on line a few weeks ago. I definitely didn’t need it but what has need got to do with anything.”

Genevieve T says “The Fox is entirely appropriate for the year I think! It is a pattern from Spruce Craft Co” https://www.sprucecraftco.com/collections/unique-cross-stitch-patterns/products/foxy-pair

Show and Tell 4 May 2020

We don’t usually have general meetings on an ACT Public Holiday (last Monday for ANZAC Day), however this week, Show and Tell is back. Lesley F is making progress on her piece, and Tracey K has a great sense of satisfaction in having finished some things.


Tracey K has a contribution for the Guild gift shop

Tracey K says that this Sashiko panel was a birthday present and was a pleasure to stitch – Dragonflies and irises by HM textiles. Stitched with DMC perle 8 – 92.

Tracey K says that this last one is a piece of sashiko that her mum started and she finished and made it into a purse for her mum’s birthday. The pattern in Shippo tsunagi stitched in Olympus thread Variegated Blue – color #72

Show and Tell 20 April 2020

Here are some more creations, old and new, from members. And you can’t stop members from finding a way to share knowledge. Sarah K says: “Now I am off to spend the day video conferencing with my 25 year old niece who wanted to learn how to embroider. She was going to come down from Sydney for a visit, but we have had to find a different way. I sent her a package of goodies and we are starting on a canvas work bookmark today. It will be interesting to teach via video conference, but I am sure we will work it out somehow.”


Monica A says:
This is a piece I did soon after I joined the guild, so probably between 1996 and 1998. The guild had a scented sachet challenge as part of the Christmas party and I decided to make a eucalyptus scented sachet. It’s made entirely out of hand-painted silk. I had painted the silk and made the leaves, and the wonderful Margaret Roberts, who convened the creative group at that time, suggested I add the flowers – and showed me how to do them. The flowers really lifted the piece.


Agnes S describes her work:
Well it’s an original and it’s on organza. It is 3D and I made up the picture using photos from internet.

Diana C has been able to finish her stunning Black Cockatoo.

Gail H says:
My counted cross stitch band is now ready to attach to a hand towel, for the Guild gift shop. The design is from a DMC Creative World booklet – Ideas for Embroidery.


Julie’s mystery project

Members will know that Julie K is just brimming with creativity, and we never know what she will come up with next. Sometimes Julie likes to tease her friends with something crafty, and recently she had a little “competition” asking for guesses as to what her latest project was going to turn out to be.

Here are her comments, complete with some “fun facts”!:

OK so this is ‘Lady Covid Bug’. She certainly is a crowning glory bug. You can see she is not tiny, the 50c piece gives her scale.

Fun Facts:
There are over 5,000 species globally
An adult can live from 1 to 3 years
Main predators are frogs, wasps and spiders
They have 6 short legs
They have a top speed 24km/h
They secrete an oily, yukky, yellow fluid from joints in their legs.
Diet – mostly carnivores
In its lifespan a single ladybird can gobble up more than 5,000 aphids
The most common ladybird has seven spots
Maximum length 1cm
Some people may be allergic to their bites and may develop a rash
In many cultures they are considered GOOD LUCK (you got it)

Show and Tell – 13 April 2020

Feedback from members indicates that many of us have decided to continue our regular Monday Guild meeting embroidery. Liz C has said “The first Monday in “lockdown” I pretended to go to the Embroiderer’s Guild. Got my bag, said Goodbye to my husband and headed out one door and in another. Of course we started with a cuppa!”
So members, settle down with your beverage, keep on stitching your Monday projects, and don’t forget to send in some photos (works in progress, as well as finished items are welcome) – our member newsletter told you how and where to send them.


Sarah K says:
I have actually started putting needle and thread together on my creative challenge piece, and it is starting to come together. Also it gave me a chance to get out my Kumihimo Disk and make some cord to use on it. Lots of fun and very meditative once I got into the flow. I am also trying to spend my Mondays doing the embroidery that I would usually take the guild. As my travelling piece, it wouldn’t otherwise get much done on it at the moment. It is a design by Paula Dengel which was included in one of the Nordic Needle annual competitions.

Meryl F has been enjoying the company of her regular visiting magpies. She doesn’t have anything ready to show this week, but says:
Have my head in my current embroidery piece……trying to remember the method for lacy wrap…..almost about to stamp my feet!!!!! Does that sound crazy enough?

Lesley J has finished her “travelling sampler”, that went with her on a tour of Europe (mentioned in a previous Monday Facebook post), and is now wondering what to do with it!

Lesley J hopes that there will be many more angels like this. The pattern is from Burda Hardanger E862

Lesley J has been busy! This dogwood, from Candamar Design, is waiting to be washed and blocked. This pattern came from the Guild recycle table.

Gail H was working on a counted cross stitch, eventually to go onto a hand towel for the Guild gift shop. She said:
I remembered that the pedal thingy was in the garage, so now I can multitask!

Show and Tell – 6 April 2020



Jillian B is obviously getting an early start for Christmas, and has sent in this photo of her craft table

Our member Loic J has recently been studying Chinese embroidery in Adelaide with Margaret Lee. Here is what he is currently working on while back home in Canberra. He says it’s not finished yet(!), and adds: I’m pretty happy with myself, the second layer of the fur cat face is done and can go back to the fur body. I have some colour arrangements to do with the white but will do that during the 3rd layer.

#australia #canberra #embroideryisart #embroidery #handmadeembroidery #handembroidery #chineseembroidery #chinese #cat #threadpainting #silk #peinturealaiguille #broderiedart #broderiechinoise #broderie #broderiemain #chat #soie

Greenhills 3

Well, it’s been a while but it’s time to catch up with the rest of the photos from our annual stitching weekend at Greenhills Conference Centre.

Greenhills cockies 1Greenhills cockies 2

 

 

Greenhills magpie

More wildlife at Greenhills 2015.  The sulphur-crested cockies were on the lookout for seeds left out by the kitchen staff.  The magpie felt left out, but was not brave enough to take on the cockies.

 

Jeanette at Greenhills 2015

 

 

Jeanette was happy for me take this photo of her wearing her lanyard made at Stitching on the Lake, a class with Fiona Horden and SylviaFrazer.

 

 

 

 

There was plenty of cross stitch happening, with a confession or two that that there are UFO’s that may have spent some time languishing in cupboards between episodes of activity.

Cherry Blossom Waterfall, counted cross stitch by Margaret Kelemen

Cherry Blossom Waterfall, counted cross stitch by Margaret Kelemen

Counted x stitch by Polly Templeton

Thea Governeur counted cross stitch kit by Polly Templeton

Counted x stitch by Tracey Kent

Great Dixter, Northiam, East Sussex counted cross stitch kit by Tracey Kent

Counted x stitch horse 1 by Anne Hazell

Country Horses, Anchor counted cross stitch kit by Anne Hazell

Counted x stitch horse 2 by Anne Hazell

Counted cross stitch by Anne Hazell

Counted x stitch Xmas card panels by Tina Korda

Tina Korda was working on counted cross stitch panels for Christmas cards

 

As a change from embroidery, there was some crochet and knitting going on.

Crochet squares by Ellen Tynan

Crochet squares by Ellen Tynan

Knitted tea cosy1 by Diana Churchill

Cleckheaton pattern for pineapple tea cosy

Knitted tea cosy2 by Diana Churchill

Pineapple tea cosy by Diana Churchill

 

Diana has told me that this will be for the teapot used for peaceful cups of tea at a special place in her garden.

 

 

Pam Hynd was working on this exquisite Jacobean Embroidery work, threadpainting using DMC threads, from Sarah’s Hand Embroidery Tutorials.

Jacobean work 1 by Pam Hynd Jacobean work 2 by Pam Hynd Jacobean work 3 by Pam Hynd Jacobean work 4 by Pam Hynd Jacobean work 5 by Pam Hynd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polly Templeton also worked on this Japanese Beading project, from a class by Margaret Lee.

Japanese beadwork 2 by Polly TempletonJapanese beadwork 1 by Polly Templeton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Kimmorley was working on this Crewel piece that came from a class by Carolyn Pearce.

Crewel work 3 by Sarah KimmorleyCrewel work 1 by Sarah KimmorleyCrewel work 2 by Sarah Kimmorley

 

 

 

 

This floral drawstring bag, designed by Sylvia Fraser, was being worked on by Rhonda Howlett.

Floral drawstring bag 1 by Rhonda Howlett Floral drawstring bag 2 by Rhonda Howlett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jenny Balderson was working on her Bayeux Tapestry panel.

Bayeux Tapestry panel1 by Jenny Balderson Bayeux Tapestry panel2 by Jenny Balderson Bayeux Tapestry panel3 by Jenny Balderson

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have had a previous blog about the Bayeux Tapestry, which you can find here.

 

Claire Westley worked on her Portugese Whitework, and some Canvaswork which came out of a NSW Embroiderers’ Guild class on basic embroidery techniques.

Canvas work by Claire Westley Porugese whitework by Claire Westley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pincushion panel by Di Ballantyne

A sweet little panel for a pincushion by Di Ballantyne.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even more creativity with this applique panel, pattern entitled Cairo Rug Makers, by Kate Ross.

Cairo rug makers applique panel by Kate Ross

 

And coasters created by Susan Douds, painted with acrylic paints and sealed.

Coasters by Susan Douds

 

This panel was being prepared by Libby Williams, to be embellished with Goldwork.

Panel ready for embellishment byBerry Quilting Exhibition

 

 

Libby’s panel of an embellished Angel has been used in the advertising for this year’s Berry Quilting Exhibition.

 

 

 

 

Well, that’s the end of my notes from Greenhills 2015, I hope you enjoyed the creativity and variety, and a big thank you to Brenda Phillips for her great job in organising another fun stitching get-together.  If I’ve missed anyone, I apologise, but at least no-one can say that we sat around just eating and talking!  Look out for Greenhills again next year – members and friends, both old and new, are always welcome for a day, or the whole weekend.

Gail

 

 

 

 

 

 

Textiles in Canberra

After my Stitching Delights in Melbourne blog post, I thought “what about all the stitching delights in and around Canberra?”  Some people know that I spend a bit of time at the Australian War Memorial, where there are numerous examples of textiles and embroidery, such as:

Tapestry @ AWM Based on oil painting by Imants Tillers

Tapestry @ AWM
Based on oil painting by Imants Tillers

 

This tapestry, entitled Avenue of Remembrance, was commissioned by the AWM from the Australian Tapestry Workshop, and completed in 2015.

It is based on an oil painting by Imants Tillers, and took master weavers over 2,380 hours to complete. The poetic landscape is reminiscent of wartime roads on the Western Front, and the many Avenues of Remembrance planted around Australia after the end of the First World War.

Tapestry @ AWM Based on oil painting by Imants Tillers

Tapestry @ AWM
Based on oil painting by Imants Tillers

 

 

 

If you would like to find out more about the making of this beautiful work of art, click here, where you can see the full scale and detail of the work.

 

 

 

 

Have you heard of The Digger’s Dress?  It was made by three double amputees while they were in hospital in London during the First World War, and presented to Mrs Minnie Rattigan, one of the founders of the “ANZAC Buffet”, which provided free meals and entertainment to Australian servicemen.

The Digger's Dress  @ AWM

The Digger’s Dress @ AWM

The tabard features hand embroidery, and the skirt has appliqued unit colour patches. More detail can be found here.

That’s just a very small taste, so here’s a challenge – visit the Australian War Memorial, and look for some of my favourites:  patriotic crocheted milk jug cover; Rising Sun flag hand embroidered by veteran in hospital; woollen army blanket covered with embroidery by WW2 prisoner of war;  and much, much more on display.  Warning: might entail more than one visit!

And while I’m talking about the AWM, and it’s school holidays, there are some Drop-in Craft sessions, where children can enjoy making their own colour patch, bookmark, or poppy to take home.

Women employees of the Australian Glass Manufacturing Company inspecting their knitting, part of their donation to the Woollies for Britain Appeal. 1944 (141750)

Women employees of the Australian Glass Manufacturing Company inspecting their knitting, part of their donation to the Woollies for Britain Appeal. 1944 (141750)

And not bragging or anything, but our own Guild has participated in a number of Projects of National Significance.  Which reminds me, we must add Princess Charlotte’s Blanket to the list.

Enjoy!

Gail

Greenhills 2

Greenhills kangaroos

As promised, here is the second instalment on the fun and creativity at our annual stitching weekend.  The mother kangaroo and her joey were spotted on the lawns while we were outside at afternoon tea.

 

Blackwork by Christine Bailey

Blackwork by Christine Bailey

 Deceptively simple, Christine Bailey says small blackwork samplers are quick and easy to do.

 Susan Douds brought her Blue Wren, designed by Lesley Turpin-Delport, which Susan had started in a workshop at Beating Around the Bush in Adelaide.  In these photos Susan had just finished the ribbon embroidery and had started inserting some real “whispy” feathers.

Blue wren 1 by Susan Douds

Blue wren 1 by Susan Douds

 

Blue wren 2 by Susan Douds

Blue wren 2 by Susan Douds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here is the finished result, a spectacular example of mixed-media, dimensional embroidery.

Blue Wren worked by Susan Douds

Blue Wren worked by Susan Douds

 

Sadly I didn’t manage to get a photo of the real blue wren (also known here as fairy wren) family that was playing in the bushes outside, so here is a picture from the CSIRO.  The girl is the dull brown, and the boy gets the fancy plumage!

blue wrens

Jillian Bath had brought in another Lesley Turpin-Delport design, Nesting Weaver.  If you’d like to find out more about this designer and her designs, click here.

Nesting Weaver 1 by Jillian Bath

Nesting Weaver 1 by Jillian Bath

Nesting Weaver 2 by Jillian Bath

Nesting Weaver 2 by Jillian Bath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jillian always seems to have a selection of lovely accessories with her whenever I see her.   Just how many do you have, Jillian?  Never mind, don’t confess anything…

Jillian Bath accessories 1Jillian Bath accessories 2

 

 

 

 


 

Smocking by Liz Bell

Smocking by Liz Bell

 

 

Liz Bell had moved on to some smocking

 

 

 

 

 

Robin by Libby Williams

Robin by Libby Williams

 

 

 

And Libby Williams was working on this Nicola Jarvis Studio design, a Morris-inspired crewel work

 

 

 

Towel with roses by Alice Keeley

Towel with roses by Alice Keeley

 

 

Then Alice Keeley was busy working on small towels to become Christmas gifts.  Isn’t it lovely that ready-made rosettes combined with simple stitches create something so effective?

 

 

 

There was also plenty of Hardanger happening around the tables…

Lel Whitbread and Susan Coates were working on a project from Hardanger for the Horrified (great name!) by Jane Greenoff

Hardanger by Lel Whitbread

Hardanger by Lel Whitbread

Hardanger by Susan Coates

Hardanger by Susan Coates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hardanger by Lesley Jenesen

Hardanger by Lesley Jenesen

Hardanger by Tina Korda

Hardanger by Tina Korda

 

And some more Hardanger by Lesley Jenesen, Tina Korda, and Brenda Phillips

 

 

 

 

 

Hardanger cloth by Brenda Phillips

Hardanger cloth by Brenda Phillips

 

Margaret O’Beirne was working on a canvaswork kit Tuscan Midnight by Kathy Rees of Needlelights Originals.

Canvaswork 1 by Margaret OBeirne

Canvaswork by Margaret O”Beirne

Canvaswork by Margaret O"Beirne

Canvaswork by Margaret O”Beirne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kay Reid had brought in a canvaswork begun on her latest cruise.

Canvaswork by Kay Reid

Canvaswork by Kay Reid

There was just so much going on at Greenhills, I think I’ll have to go on to a third blog, but finally for this one, just another taste of Ruth Ellis‘s fabric baskets.

Basket by Ruth Ellis

Basket by Ruth Ellis

Basket by Ruth Ellis

Basket by Ruth Ellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a great stitching weekend.

Gail

 

 

 

Stitching Delights in Melbourne

I had a few days in Melbourne recently, and had to share with you some delightful stitching experiences.

The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria – open day

It happened that the Guild was having an open day at Embroidery House in Malvern, so how could I resist?

Embroidery House 1 VicEmbroidery House 2 VicEmbroidery House 3 VicEmbroidery House 4 Vic

I’m sure that embroiderers anywhere would be thrilled to have such a wonderful creative environment!  Once I had overcome my envy, I was made very welcome by President Anne and other members, and joined the throng of visitors to admire the demonstrations of different machine and hand embroidery techniques.  As seems to be the case with embroiderers everywhere, members were busy generously sharing their enthusiasm and knowledge, and here is just a small sample:

Machine embroidery  Embroidery House 7 Vic

 

Embroidery House 6 Vic

 

 

 

 

 

 

Embroidery House 5 Vic

Sandra Warren Smith introduced me to the delights of Lefkara Embroidery, which is a traditional embroidery technique from Cyprus also known as Lefkara Lace, or Lefkaritika.  Mmm, will have to investigate this one further, starting here.

 

 

 

 

Embroidery House 9 VicSandra told me that books on this technique are few and far between, so here is one by Androula Hadjiyiasemi.  I will be checking our own Guild’s library, plus those talented members who do Hardanger and all kinds of drawn thread, needlelace etc..

 

 

 

 

 

I had to tear myself away, but not before buying a couple of things from the book sale (you can never have too many embroidery books).   On the way out, I noticed that even the doorplates have embroidery, sigh.   If you’d like to find out more about The Embroiderers Guild,Victoria, Australia, click here.

Embroidery House 8 Vic


Then it was on to the National Gallery of Victoria, for the exhibition Exquisite Threads: English Embroidery 1600s – 1900s, showcasing examples of English domestic and professional embroidery from the NGV’s own collection, plus from private collectors, the National Gallery of Australia, the Melbourne Diocesan Historical Commission, and members of The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria.  Non-flash photography allowed, yippee!

Exquisite Threads 3Exquisite Threads 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Used for apprentice embroiderers to learn stitches, as recording of stitches and patterns for domestic embroidery, then an important part of the education of young women, samplers in the exhibition dated from 1692 to 1932.

Exquisite Threads 5

Sorry about the quality of my photo of this Wessex embroidery sampler, completed by Margaret Foster in 1932, but I couldn’t resist the opportunity to digress into mentioning our Guild’s classes on WESSEX STITCHERY with Annette Dziedzic.

Wessex Stitchery

Please note that the dates have been changed for this class, now on 11 and 25 July, with preparation on 6 July, but keep checking our web site here any time you would like to check out our classes schedule.  I hear that Robyn Duncan, our Classes Co-ordinator, already has an exciting list of internal and external tutors coming up for 2016.

But back to the exhibition.

Exquisite Threads 1Exquisite Threads 2

 

 

Here we have a Privy Councillor’s uniform from 1939, and an ecclesiastical cope made in 1853.

 

 

 

 

Exquisite Threads 6 Exquisite Threads 7 Exquisite Threads 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A waistcoat from the 1770’s, an evening cape circa 1924, and a pelisse and dress circa 1818.

 

Exquisite Threads 9 Writing box, circa 1665

 

 

 

 

 

I’m thrilled to bits with the book from the exhibition, which gives background details of the items, embroidery history from different periods, and close-up photographs showing beautiful detail.  I believe that this exhibition will not be touring, but will be on at the NGV International until 12 July, so if you can get there, it’s well worth a visit – see the details here.


Then I had to go back to the NGV International, to see A Golden Age of China, Quianlong Emperor, 1736-1795.  On loan from the Palace Museum, Beijing, it included a selection of magnificent items from the collections of this emperor, and it was truly wonderful to be able to see both front and back of silk embroidered robes.

Emperor’s ceremonial court robe Qing dynasty, Quianlong period 1736-95 silk satin The Palace Museum, Beijing (Gu42311)

No photos were allowed in this exhibition, but once again the book gives excellent information and photography.  Sadly, this exhibition finished on 21 June, but you can see more information here.


You thought I was finished?  No way, read on…

Then it was off to the Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries Costume Exhibition, at Rippon Lea House and Gardens, the National Trust property that is used as Aunt Prudence’s house in the TV series.  People who are especially interested in the costumes for this series, based on the novels by Kerry Greenwood, will know that Marion Boyce, costume designer, and Every Cloud Productions, use collected vintage items to re-create the fashion fantasies of the late 1920’s.

Miss Fisher 1Miss Fisher 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miss Fisher 3Miss Fisher 5Miss Fisher 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miss Fisher 4

Fans of the TV show will recognise these outfits from the latest series.  There was also a behind the scenes workroom exhibit, showing how costumes were constructed, and genuine 1920’s accessories, part of Marion Boyce’s personal collection.

Miss Fisher 7Miss Fisher 8

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, of course there is a book with detailed descriptions and gorgeous photos.  But then it was time for afternoon tea, still in 1920’s character, in the stable building.

Miss Fisher 9

You’re in luck if you need time to get to this one, as it’s on until 30 September 2015, and will tour to other cities.  For more information, click here.


And the WW1 Centenary Exhibition, on at the Melbourne Museum until 16 August, details here.

IWM 1More uniform goldwork.

 

 

 

 

IWM 2Would you believe this is made of paper?

IWM 4IWM 3

Ambulance officer uniform, and detail


Finally, the Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne, open all year, including the museum beneath, details here.

Shrine 1

There are textiles everywhere, including this copy of the Battle of Britain lace, circa 1942-47.

Shrine 2 Battle of Britain LaceShrine 3 Battle of Britain Lace

I’m sure I could have found more stitching delights, but only had a few days, and needed to come home for a rest!

Gail

Greenhills 1

Greenhills 2015 panorama

Greenhills 2015 panorama

The Guild’s annual stitching weekend was on again in May at the Greenhills Conference Centre, where members and friends got together for fun with stitching (actually, anything “crafty”!) from Friday evening until Sunday afternoon.  It was a great success, with stitching, conversation, food, stitching, conversation, food, stitching, conversation, food….  you get the idea.  And yes, that is frost on the grass first thing in the morning, but most of us were tucked up nice and warm, apart from the intrepid people who managed to fit in a jog or two in the beautiful bushland surroundings.

Friday evening, and some people were all set up and raring to go, fortified by a glass of some bubbly stuff, and  Liz Bell was easing herself into things with some knitting.  My lips are sealed regarding the identity of the person who arrived having left behind her bag of clothing, but at least she brought the most important thing, her needlework!

Fri night2 GreenhillsLiz Bell GeenhillsFri night3 Greenhills

 

But in case you thought that it was all eating, drinking (seriously, it was mostly tea, coffee or water), and making merry, here is a glimpse (in no particular order) of what some people worked on over the weekend.

Petit point dragon 1 by Anne Stewart

Anne Stewart was working on this petit point project, which will become a dragon entitled “Woodland Guardian’, from Heaven and Earth Designs.

 

 

 

 


Away in a manger 1 by Kathy Pascoe

Kathy Pascoe began with this “Away in a Manger” stitchery kit from Button Bliss.  Wooden nativity figure buttons will be added, and Kathy plans to add a Christmas themed border and make into a wall hanging.

Pink chairs 1 by Kathy PascoeOnce she had gone as far as she could with the stitching on her first project, Kathy moved on to this sweet project incorporating stem stitch, french knots and backstitch.


Counted cross stitch Diana Churchill

Diana Churchill began the weekend continuing on a counted cross stitch for her grandson, who just loves border collies.

… and here is the completed work.  The puppy’s name is “Shadow”.  Counted x stitch 2 by Diana Churchill


There’s more than one lucky grandchild who will receive a beautiful gift.  Prue Deacon was working on her original canvaswork design for her grandson, who loves all things relating to the beach.  This has a seaside theme incorporating elements from family photos and seaside pictures.

Canvaswork 2 by Prue DeaconCanvaswork 1 by Prue Deacon


Baskets 1 by Ruth Ellis

Ruth Ellis came equipped with her sewing machine to make more of her fabulous fabric bowls.

 

Baskets 7 by Ruth Ellis

 

Ruth says it takes about 40 metres of fabric-covered cord to make each bowl.  Apparently wrapping cord with fabric is a great TV-watching activity!

 

 

I’m going to make you wait for another post to see some of Ruth’s finished work, and much more.  There’s plenty more stitching activity to show from Greenhills!  I tried to take detailed notes, but if I’ve inadvertently left out acknowledgements, I’m sorry, the talking, stitching and eating were very distracting!

Gail