Elizabeth’s Hungarian Embroidery Heirlooms

Hi Everyone

This post shares some wonderful Hungarian embroidery in the collection of one of our members Elizabeth Hooper. Her family migrated to Australia from Hungary and these pieces are all part of their story and family history.

When Elizabeth looks at them she sees not only lovely stitching but people and places and memories.

Apron

This apron was a wedding present to Elizabeth from her Mum’s aunt and was all hand stitched by members of the family. If you’d like a closer look just click on the photos.

Apron with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

I’m lucky enough to have seen and handled this piece and it’s exquisite – the design, stitching and colours work wonderfully together. Elizabeth says that it always gets lots of comments when she wears it.

Tablecloth with Leaf Motif

This tablecloth was embroidered by Elizabeth’s Mum and so is very special

Centre of Tablecloth with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Leaf Detail from Tablecloth with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Flower Detail from Tablecloth with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Now look at these from the back – amazingly neat!

Back of Centre of Tableclorh with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Back of Leaf Detail from Tablecloth with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Back of Flower Detail from Tablecloth with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Traditional Tablerunner

This was another hand embroidered gift from Elizabeth’s family in Hungary

Tablerunner with Brown and Gold Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Detail of Tablerunner with Brown and Gold Hingarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Corner of Tablerunner with Brown and Gold Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Elizabeth’s Own Hungarian Piece

This is the first piece that Elizabeth did with her Mum teaching her Hungarian techniques

Corner of tablecloth embroidered by Elizabeth Hooper

Pillowslip 

This pillowslip was also a gift from family in Hungary

Pillowcase with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

 

Red on Red 

This striking piece of red on red Hungarian embroidery was bought on one of Elizabeth’s trips back to Hungary. She found it in Edger where the lady was embroidering these pieces in her shop.

Red on Red Tablerunner with Hungarian Embroidery 2 belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Red on Red Table Runner with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Flower Detail on Red on Red Tablerunner with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Hungarian Bread Basket

This piece was also bought in Hungary – the embroidery is done by hand but all the edgings are machine sewn.

Hungarian Bread Basket belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Black Table Cloth 

This dramatic piece was another purchase this time in Budapest:

Centre of Black Tablecloth with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Basket Corner from Black Tablecloth with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Flower Motif from Black Tablecloth with Hungarian Embroidery belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Kalocsa Hungarian Embroidery

These two doilies were bought from a family friend in Hungary who had embroidered them. The lacework was once done by hand but is now done by machine.

Kalocsa Hungarian Embroidery Doyley 2 belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

Kalocsa Hungarian Embroidery Doyley belonging to Elizabeth Hooper

 

If you’d like to try Kalocsa embroidery there’s a pattern on pages 40-45 of Inspirations Magazine No. 60. This includes instructions for making the delicate lace edging and the whipped tulle stitch that creates the netting between the floral motifs.

Mary Corbet of the Needle n’ Thread blog has been journalling a Redwork Hungarian Embroidery runner and you can see where she’s up to here

A big thanks to Elizabeth for sharing these precious heirlooms

Enjoy!

Carmen

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One Response to Elizabeth’s Hungarian Embroidery Heirlooms

  1. Deb Love says:

    just lovely pieces to look at