Greenhills 2

Greenhills kangaroos

As promised, here is the second instalment on the fun and creativity at our annual stitching weekend.  The mother kangaroo and her joey were spotted on the lawns while we were outside at afternoon tea.

 

Blackwork by Christine Bailey

Blackwork by Christine Bailey

 Deceptively simple, Christine Bailey says small blackwork samplers are quick and easy to do.

 Susan Douds brought her Blue Wren, designed by Lesley Turpin-Delport, which Susan had started in a workshop at Beating Around the Bush in Adelaide.  In these photos Susan had just finished the ribbon embroidery and had started inserting some real “whispy” feathers.

Blue wren 1 by Susan Douds

Blue wren 1 by Susan Douds

 

Blue wren 2 by Susan Douds

Blue wren 2 by Susan Douds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here is the finished result, a spectacular example of mixed-media, dimensional embroidery.

Blue Wren worked by Susan Douds

Blue Wren worked by Susan Douds

 

Sadly I didn’t manage to get a photo of the real blue wren (also known here as fairy wren) family that was playing in the bushes outside, so here is a picture from the CSIRO.  The girl is the dull brown, and the boy gets the fancy plumage!

blue wrens

Jillian Bath had brought in another Lesley Turpin-Delport design, Nesting Weaver.  If you’d like to find out more about this designer and her designs, click here.

Nesting Weaver 1 by Jillian Bath

Nesting Weaver 1 by Jillian Bath

Nesting Weaver 2 by Jillian Bath

Nesting Weaver 2 by Jillian Bath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jillian always seems to have a selection of lovely accessories with her whenever I see her.   Just how many do you have, Jillian?  Never mind, don’t confess anything…

Jillian Bath accessories 1Jillian Bath accessories 2

 

 

 

 


 

Smocking by Liz Bell

Smocking by Liz Bell

 

 

Liz Bell had moved on to some smocking

 

 

 

 

 

Robin by Libby Williams

Robin by Libby Williams

 

 

 

And Libby Williams was working on this Nicola Jarvis Studio design, a Morris-inspired crewel work

 

 

 

Towel with roses by Alice Keeley

Towel with roses by Alice Keeley

 

 

Then Alice Keeley was busy working on small towels to become Christmas gifts.  Isn’t it lovely that ready-made rosettes combined with simple stitches create something so effective?

 

 

 

There was also plenty of Hardanger happening around the tables…

Lel Whitbread and Susan Coates were working on a project from Hardanger for the Horrified (great name!) by Jane Greenoff

Hardanger by Lel Whitbread

Hardanger by Lel Whitbread

Hardanger by Susan Coates

Hardanger by Susan Coates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hardanger by Lesley Jenesen

Hardanger by Lesley Jenesen

Hardanger by Tina Korda

Hardanger by Tina Korda

 

And some more Hardanger by Lesley Jenesen, Tina Korda, and Brenda Phillips

 

 

 

 

 

Hardanger cloth by Brenda Phillips

Hardanger cloth by Brenda Phillips

 

Margaret O’Beirne was working on a canvaswork kit Tuscan Midnight by Kathy Rees of Needlelights Originals.

Canvaswork 1 by Margaret OBeirne

Canvaswork by Margaret O”Beirne

Canvaswork by Margaret O"Beirne

Canvaswork by Margaret O”Beirne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kay Reid had brought in a canvaswork begun on her latest cruise.

Canvaswork by Kay Reid

Canvaswork by Kay Reid

There was just so much going on at Greenhills, I think I’ll have to go on to a third blog, but finally for this one, just another taste of Ruth Ellis‘s fabric baskets.

Basket by Ruth Ellis

Basket by Ruth Ellis

Basket by Ruth Ellis

Basket by Ruth Ellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a great stitching weekend.

Gail

 

 

 

Stitching Delights in Melbourne

I had a few days in Melbourne recently, and had to share with you some delightful stitching experiences.

The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria – open day

It happened that the Guild was having an open day at Embroidery House in Malvern, so how could I resist?

Embroidery House 1 VicEmbroidery House 2 VicEmbroidery House 3 VicEmbroidery House 4 Vic

I’m sure that embroiderers anywhere would be thrilled to have such a wonderful creative environment!  Once I had overcome my envy, I was made very welcome by President Anne and other members, and joined the throng of visitors to admire the demonstrations of different machine and hand embroidery techniques.  As seems to be the case with embroiderers everywhere, members were busy generously sharing their enthusiasm and knowledge, and here is just a small sample:

Machine embroidery  Embroidery House 7 Vic

 

Embroidery House 6 Vic

 

 

 

 

 

 

Embroidery House 5 Vic

Sandra Warren Smith introduced me to the delights of Lefkara Embroidery, which is a traditional embroidery technique from Cyprus also known as Lefkara Lace, or Lefkaritika.  Mmm, will have to investigate this one further, starting here.

 

 

 

 

Embroidery House 9 VicSandra told me that books on this technique are few and far between, so here is one by Androula Hadjiyiasemi.  I will be checking our own Guild’s library, plus those talented members who do Hardanger and all kinds of drawn thread, needlelace etc..

 

 

 

 

 

I had to tear myself away, but not before buying a couple of things from the book sale (you can never have too many embroidery books).   On the way out, I noticed that even the doorplates have embroidery, sigh.   If you’d like to find out more about The Embroiderers Guild,Victoria, Australia, click here.

Embroidery House 8 Vic


Then it was on to the National Gallery of Victoria, for the exhibition Exquisite Threads: English Embroidery 1600s – 1900s, showcasing examples of English domestic and professional embroidery from the NGV’s own collection, plus from private collectors, the National Gallery of Australia, the Melbourne Diocesan Historical Commission, and members of The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria.  Non-flash photography allowed, yippee!

Exquisite Threads 3Exquisite Threads 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Used for apprentice embroiderers to learn stitches, as recording of stitches and patterns for domestic embroidery, then an important part of the education of young women, samplers in the exhibition dated from 1692 to 1932.

Exquisite Threads 5

Sorry about the quality of my photo of this Wessex embroidery sampler, completed by Margaret Foster in 1932, but I couldn’t resist the opportunity to digress into mentioning our Guild’s classes on WESSEX STITCHERY with Annette Dziedzic.

Wessex Stitchery

Please note that the dates have been changed for this class, now on 11 and 25 July, with preparation on 6 July, but keep checking our web site here any time you would like to check out our classes schedule.  I hear that Robyn Duncan, our Classes Co-ordinator, already has an exciting list of internal and external tutors coming up for 2016.

But back to the exhibition.

Exquisite Threads 1Exquisite Threads 2

 

 

Here we have a Privy Councillor’s uniform from 1939, and an ecclesiastical cope made in 1853.

 

 

 

 

Exquisite Threads 6 Exquisite Threads 7 Exquisite Threads 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A waistcoat from the 1770’s, an evening cape circa 1924, and a pelisse and dress circa 1818.

 

Exquisite Threads 9 Writing box, circa 1665

 

 

 

 

 

I’m thrilled to bits with the book from the exhibition, which gives background details of the items, embroidery history from different periods, and close-up photographs showing beautiful detail.  I believe that this exhibition will not be touring, but will be on at the NGV International until 12 July, so if you can get there, it’s well worth a visit – see the details here.


Then I had to go back to the NGV International, to see A Golden Age of China, Quianlong Emperor, 1736-1795.  On loan from the Palace Museum, Beijing, it included a selection of magnificent items from the collections of this emperor, and it was truly wonderful to be able to see both front and back of silk embroidered robes.

Emperor’s ceremonial court robe Qing dynasty, Quianlong period 1736-95 silk satin The Palace Museum, Beijing (Gu42311)

No photos were allowed in this exhibition, but once again the book gives excellent information and photography.  Sadly, this exhibition finished on 21 June, but you can see more information here.


You thought I was finished?  No way, read on…

Then it was off to the Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries Costume Exhibition, at Rippon Lea House and Gardens, the National Trust property that is used as Aunt Prudence’s house in the TV series.  People who are especially interested in the costumes for this series, based on the novels by Kerry Greenwood, will know that Marion Boyce, costume designer, and Every Cloud Productions, use collected vintage items to re-create the fashion fantasies of the late 1920’s.

Miss Fisher 1Miss Fisher 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miss Fisher 3Miss Fisher 5Miss Fisher 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miss Fisher 4

Fans of the TV show will recognise these outfits from the latest series.  There was also a behind the scenes workroom exhibit, showing how costumes were constructed, and genuine 1920’s accessories, part of Marion Boyce’s personal collection.

Miss Fisher 7Miss Fisher 8

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, of course there is a book with detailed descriptions and gorgeous photos.  But then it was time for afternoon tea, still in 1920’s character, in the stable building.

Miss Fisher 9

You’re in luck if you need time to get to this one, as it’s on until 30 September 2015, and will tour to other cities.  For more information, click here.


And the WW1 Centenary Exhibition, on at the Melbourne Museum until 16 August, details here.

IWM 1More uniform goldwork.

 

 

 

 

IWM 2Would you believe this is made of paper?

IWM 4IWM 3

Ambulance officer uniform, and detail


Finally, the Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne, open all year, including the museum beneath, details here.

Shrine 1

There are textiles everywhere, including this copy of the Battle of Britain lace, circa 1942-47.

Shrine 2 Battle of Britain LaceShrine 3 Battle of Britain Lace

I’m sure I could have found more stitching delights, but only had a few days, and needed to come home for a rest!

Gail

Classes and Creativity

Pat Bootland‘s recent class, Box Construction, was popular for members looking for a way to display small pieces of embroidery.  Of course, Pat came prepared to give us plenty of inspiration in the form of her own sample boxes, plus books and magazines that the Library helpers had kindly found for the class:

PatPootland Box Class

Box 1 Pat Bootland Box 2 Pat Bootland

 

 

 

 

Box 4 Pat Bootland Box 3 Pat Bootland

 

 

 

 

Box 6 Pat BootlandBox 7 Pat Bootland

 

 

 

 

 

 

Box 8 Pat Bootland

 

Class members (especially me) appreciated that in week 2 Pat helped us to sort out any “technical difficulties” we had found since week 1!

 

 

 

 

Not all boxes were finished by the end of the second class, so here are just a couple:

Box 1 by Dorothy Brann

 

Dorothy Brann used her lovely Hardanger sample

 

Box 2 by Dorothy Brann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Box 1 by Sarah Kimmorley

 

 

Here is the first of Sarah Kimmorley‘s Canvaswork samples to create Christmas box gifts.

Box 2 by Sarah KimmorleyAnd who wouldn’t want to receive such a lovely gift?


The Creative Group meeting in May was playing with Dorset Buttons with a Difference.  Once again, Library volunteers had produced some books and magazines, Pat Bootland and Fran Novitski had organised supplies and samples, and there was plenty of work in progress:

Dorset buttons with a difference 1

Dorset buttons with a difference 2 Dorset buttons with a difference 3

Dorset buttons with a difference 4Dorset buttons with a difference 5


Last but not least, our School Holiday Program was once again full of fun and stitching activity.  Felties were not the only projects on offer, but I managed to photograph these:

Feltie budgie by Ada Feltie frog by Sam Feltie penguin by Maddy


Sweet budgie was made by Ada, frog with bling by Sam, and stylish penguin by Maddy.  It’s hard to believe, but the next school holidays will be upon us soon, and Lel Whitbread as usual has planning under control.

Don’t forget, you don’t have to be a Guild member to join our classes, although there are Member and Non-member class fees.  You can check for any of our upcoming classes/workshops here, and Special Interest Groups here.  Or check our What’s on at a glance page any time, visitors are always welcome.

Happy, and creative, stitching.

Gail