If You Love Threadpainting……….

Hi everyone

This post is specially for those of you who love threadpainting.

First up I’m going to share two birds exquisitely embroidered by Sharon Burrell.

Here’s an awesome Eastern Bluebird from a needle painting workshop with Tanja Berlin that Sharon took at the 2013 Koala Conventions (this is an event held in Brisbane & showcasing a range of embroidery workshops – you can find the 2015 Program here).

Eastern Bluebird stitched by Sharon Burrell

Detail 1 of Eastern Bluebird stitched by Sharon Burrell

Detail 2 of Eastern Bluebird stitched by Sharon Burrell

Doesn’t Sharon just rock this design?

The next piece is called Summer Jewel and is technically a crewel kit from Elsa Williams but it’s all done in long and short stitch so I’ve included it here.

Summer Jewel stitched by Sharon Burrell

Detail 1 of Summer Jewel stitched by Sharon Burrell

Detail 2 of Summer Jewel stitched by Sharon Burrell

Thank you so much Sharon for sharing your beautiful work & Stewart (Bath) for the great photos.

2014 Stitching Love and Hope Postcard by Marjorie Gilby

If you’ve been reading this blog for a while you’ll be familiar with Marjorie’s stitching as we’ve featured it a number of times. For the 2014 Creative Challenge she has created a postcard using the thread painting technique.

It’s a breathtaking dog rose in the most glorious shades of red……

2014 Creative Challenge Postcard by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 1 of 2014 Creative Challenge Postcard by Gilby Marjorie

Detail 2 of 2014 Creative Challenge Postcard by Marjorie Gilby

 

Enjoy!

Carmen

News Update

Hi everyone

Just a heads up to let you know that I’ve updated the following galleries:

Canvaswork

Contemporary Creative Embroidery

Crazy Quilting

Cross Stitch

Landscapes and Scenes

Needlelace

Silk Ribbon Embroidery

Stumpwork & Textured Stitching

Young Stitchers

The new additions are at the top of each gallery page.

And here’s a preview of a small sample of the photos uploaded:

Octagonal Box Lid with Needlelace & Goldwork

Detail 3 of Octagonal Box Lid with Needlelace and Goldwork stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Stumpwork Butterfly stitched by Jillian Bath

Embroidered landscape

Spring in the Forest stitched by Betty Matthews

Embroidered box

Side 2 of Oriental Box by Marjorie Gilby

Ribbon embroidery flowers

Detail of Ribbon Embroidery Flowers by Mary Bowron

Historical Embroidery Books

In a couple of recent posts Mary Corbett in her Needle ‘N Thread blog listed a number of great historical embroidery books that are available online and are in the public domain. You can find them here and here. The latter post includes a great Hardanger book.

Bye for now

Carmen

 

News Update

Hi everyone

A very quick post to say that I’ve updated the following galleries:

Contemporary Creative Embroidery

In this gallery it’s wonderful to see how different people have interpreted Glenys Leske’s Path to the Beach so that each work is quite individual even though the basic elements are the same.

Crewel & Surface Stitchery

Quite a bit of new eye candy here

Cross Stitch

Some delightful new work here too

Samplers

Two examples of the notebook covers from last year’s Stitch a Month classes

Here’s a taster of the photos uploaded….

Embroidered Seascape

Close up of Path to the Beach stitched by Christine Bailey

Embroidered Seascape

Detail 3 of Path to the Beach stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Cross Stitch

Cute Mice Biscornu cross stitched by Helen Nastopoulos

embroidered tray cover

Detail 3 of I had a little nut tree stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Embroidered Diary Cover

Detail 2 of Pink Lotus Diary Cover stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Last Minute Inspiration on WW1 Silk Postcards

If anyone’s still looking for some last minute inspiration for your WW1 silk postcard here are some lovely ones that belong to Guild member Helen Hardie

WW1 Silk Postcard 5 belonging to Helen Hardie

WW1 Silk Postcard 4 belonging to Helen Hardie

WW1 Silk Postcard 3 belonging to Helen Hardie

Underneath of WW1 Silk Postcard 3 belonging to Helen Hardie

WW1 Silk Postcard 2 belonging to Helen Hardie

WW1 Silk Postcard 1 belonging to Helen Hardie

Enjoy and hope you’ve having a great weekend!

Carmen

 

Stitchy Gardens


Hi again

I hope you’re having a great weekend. Here are two lovely flower embroideries just in case you’re needing some stitchy eye candy.

Thanks to Stewart Bath for the awesome photos of the stitching.

The first is another diary cover by Marjorie Gilby filled with an elegant and traditional flower garden….

Flower Garden Diary Cover stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 1 of Flower Garden Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 2 of Flower Garden Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 3 of Flower Garden Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 4 of Flower Garden Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 5 0f Flower Garden Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 6 of Flower Garden Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 7 of Flower Garden Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 8 of Flower Garden Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

The second is a lovely flower garden needle case stitched by Yvonne Kingsley…..

Flower Garden Needlecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Back of Flower Garden Needlecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Opened out Flower Garden Needlecase by Yvonne Kingsley

Detail 1 of Flower Garden Needlecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Detail 2 of Flower Garden Needlecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Detail 3 of Flower Garden Needlecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Detail 4 of Flower Garden Needlecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Detail 5 of Flower Garden Needlecase by Yvonne Kingsley

Detail 6 of Flower Garden Needlecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Detail 7 of Flower Garden Needecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Detail 8 of Flower Garden Needlecase stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Hope you get to enjoy your  garden this weekend.  Spring is starting to arrive here and the camellias, hellebores and jonquils are out in our garden – Yay!!!!

Take care

Carmen

Delightful Diary Covers

Hi everyone

The early Spring flowers are starting to appear here in Canberra so I wanted to share with you some delightful diary covers stitched by Marjorie Gilby. They feature some lovely flowers.

If you’re a fan of crewel and the thread painting of flowers you’ll love the stitching.

Here’s the first which showcases a geranium…

Geranium Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 1 of Geranium Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 2 of Geranium Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Now the second diary cover with its two violas that have a real pop of colour….

Two Violas Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 1 of Two Violas Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 2 of Two Violas Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

and here’s the third cover and it’s very striking…..

Red Flower with Beetles Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 1 of Red Flower with 2 Beetles Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 2 of Red Flower with 2 Beetles by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 3 of Red Flower and 2 Beetles Diary Cover by Marjorie Gilby

 

Again thanks heaps Marjorie for sharing your awesome embroidery with us.

Hope you have a great weekend!

Carmen

Deerfield Embroidery

Hi everyone

This post is going to focus on Deerfield Embroidery. The inspiration is a table mat stitched by Marjorie Gilby that Stewart Bath has photographed.

Where is Deerfield?

Deerfield embroidery is based on Crewel Work. It evolved in a small town in Massachusetts which you can see on a map here.

It’s a very picturesque New England town

images

What’s the story of Deerfield embroidery? 

In 1898 two women Margaret Christine Whiting and Ellen Miller founded the Deerfield Society of Blue and White Needlework.

They had found some very moth-eaten and threadbare pieces of 18th century Jacobean embroidery that had been stitched locally in New England. They wanted to replicate them so that the history and beauty of these pieces wouldn’t be lost.

At the time Crewel work was out of fashion so they had to research the materials and stitches needed to reproduce these earlier pieces. The development of Deerfield embroidery was influenced by the following practical realities:

  • the 18th century Crewel work designs had already been adapted by New England needlewomen so that they used less thread and materials.
  • the aniline dyes that were in general use after the Civil War proved to be unsuitable for dyeing embroidery thread. Most of the colours were too harsh and faded quickly when exposed to the sun
  • moth attack on textiles was a reality of daily life and therefore wool threads and materials could not be used. This forced a move to flax and linen.

As a result the earliest  embroideries produced by the Society were stitched with blue and white linen threads and the occasional brown shades. The blue colours were based on hand dyeing with indigo and the browns from dyeing with local tree barks.

For most people Deerfield embroidery is synonymous with blue and white embroidery.  But in fact over the life of the Society from 1898 to 1930 a whole range of colours was gradually introduced based on natural plant dyes – madder (reds and pinks), fustic (yellow) etc.

Stitches used in Deerfield

The stitches are those typical of Crewel work – Outline and Stem Stitch, Herringbone Stitch, Chain Stitch,Feather Stitch, Fly Stitch, Coral Stitch (called Snail Trail), Buttonhole and Blanket Stitch (called Spike Stitch), Satin Stitch, Seed Stitch, Lattice Stitch etc.

There were also some local variants of stitches:

  • New England Laid Stitch (both open and closed forms) which is essentially Roumanian Stitch;
  • Honeycombe Stitch which is very similar to interlocking Buttonhole Stitch but with virtually no thread carried through to the back of the fabric (one of the thread thrifty variations of classic stitches) and
  • Crows Feet Stitch which is essentially three straight stitches in the pattern \|/

Marjorie’s Deerfield Table Mat

Now for the eye candy. Here are the photos of Marjorie’s mat:

Deerfield Embroidery Napkin stitched by Marjorie Gilby

detail 1 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 2 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 3 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 4 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 5 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 6 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 7 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 8 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 9 of Deerfield Embroidery stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Other Examples of Deerfield

There’s also this example of Deerfield stitched by Margaret Kelemen in our Crewel and Surface Stitchery Gallery:

Deerfield embroidery

Deerfield embroidery stitched by Margaret Kelemen

and another piece stitched for the Guild’s collection of samples of different types of embroidery. This sample was stitched by Cecilia Skene:

Deerfield Embroidery Sample from the Guilds Collecton

 Deborah Love’s Wonderful Website

If you’d like to see some more exquisitely stitched Deerfield then head over to Deborah Love’s website and admire her awesome pieces of Deerfield Embroidery. Deborah is the President of the Queensland Guild.

Other Resources

If you want to read more of the history of this embroidery style then Deerfield Embroidery: Traditional Patterns from Colonial Massachusetts by Marjery Burnham Howe is a great read. The author was a neighbour of Margaret Whiting in the 1930s and she really evokes the social and cultural context of the Deerfield Society of Blue and White Needlework. By the way they used ‘Needlework’ and not ‘Crewel work’ because they used linen rather than wool materials and threads.

Marjorie a big thanks once again for sharing your work with us.

bye for now

Carmen

 

News Update

Hi everyone

A quick note to say I’ve updated the following Members Galleries:

Bags & Purses 

Beadwork  

Canvaswork  

Crewel & Surface Stitchery

Cross Stitch

Hardanger

Japanese Techniques

Silk Ribbon

Stumpwork & Textured Stitching

Here’s a tiny taster of the photos I’ve added.

Detail of Dragonfly Needlecase stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Embroidered Bag

Detail 4 of Embroidered Cream Bag stitched by Marjorie Gilb

Hardanger

Hardanger Table Runner stitched by Meryl Fellows

Stumpwork

Guild’s Stumpwork Sample

cushion

Detail from Canvaswork Cushion with Blue Hen stitched by Bill Thorn

Detail of Bargello Cushion  stitched by Bill Thorn

Detail of Bargello Cushion stitched by Bill Thorn

Detail 5 of Camel Rug stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Crewel embroidery stool

Detail of Crewel Stool stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Hope you enjoy the pics and have a great weekend!

Carmen

Sublime Needlework

Hi again

I’ve previously used the adjective sublime to describe the stumpwork of Lorna Loveland here. It’s not a word to be used lightly but it absolutely also applies to this exquisite piece of needlework stitched by Marjorie Gilby.

Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

History

This piece has a really interesting history. It’s a reproduction (with some variations) of a piece of Mountmellick designed and embroidered by Miss S. Docker around 1912-1913.

Marjorie got this design from the book Australian Heritage Needlework Wildflowers edited by Jennifer Sanders which includes a range of wonderful colonial and early twentieth century designs.

This particular design is The Waratah Tray Cloth and it was contributed by Ann – Marie Bakewell. For those readers who don’t live in Australia a Waratah is a spectacular native flower and the floral emblem of New South Wales.

25773254.Waratah

Mountmellick

Mountmellick is a type of Whitework embroidery with floral motifs that developed in the Irish town of Mountmellick around 1825. It uses predominantly knotted and padded stitches to create a richly textured surface. Traditionally it’s worked in a white matt thread on white cotton satin jean fabric.

Mountmellick was popular in Australia at the turn of the century for those household items that needed frequent washing. Whitework generally was also fashionable and the motifs used were often nationalistic and featured designs based on local wildflowers.

Marjorie’s Waratah Tray Cloth

This design has adapted the original design to surface embroidery using linen fabric and coton a broder.

Let’s have a closer look….

Waratah Tray Cloth 2 stitched by Marjorie Gilby

and closer again…….

Detail 1 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 2 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 7 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 8 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

If you look at the main Waratah flower the central area is embroidered in Padded Satin Stitch. The petals are outlined in Stem Stitch and filled with needlelace in Sixteenth Lace Stitch.

Ann – Marie Bakewell notes that in researching the original embroidery by Miss Docker she found this stitch in the Encyclopedia of Needlework by Therese de Dillmont. This was one of the few embroidery reference books available in Australia when this piece would have been stitched.

What do you think of Sixteenth Lace Stitch? I’m just blown away by it and can’t wait to learn it.

Now to the Waratah bud….

Detail 3 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Again the central element is Padded Satin Stitch slanted at various angles. The petals are outlined in Stem Stitch and then filled with Laced Herringbone Stitch.

The centre spine of the leaf on the right is worked in Feather Stitch and the outline of the leaf in Crossed Buttonhole Stitch at right angles to the edge.

detail 5 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

In the large leaf above the long centre line is stitched in Slanted Buttonhole Stitch and surrounded with Seed Stitch. The outline is Indented Buttonhole Stitch.

The smaller leaf to the right in the above photo has Feather Stitch down the centre and Crossed Buttonhole Stitch along the outer edges.

detail 6 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

I was intrigued by these two leaves and the use of Oyster Chain Stitch (also called Knotted Cable Chain Stitch) to define the centre line of the top one – just awesome. The Sawtooth Buttonhole Stitch along the outline of this leaf is also incredibly effective.

Both these leaves have very clever placement of closed and open spaces to create shape and directional change.

The French Knots provide a delicate decorative effect.

Marjorie thank you so much for sharing this stunning needlework with us.

As you can tell I just adore this piece – hope you enjoy it too!

Have a great week!

Carmen

News Update

Hi everyone

Just a quick heads up that I’ve updated the following Members Galleries:

Canvaswork 

Crewel & Surface Stitchery 

Cross Stitch 

Fabric Postcards

Fibre & Yarn

Needlelace

Quilts & Wallhangings

Stumpwork & Textured Stitching

Whitework

Here are some tasters of the photos uploaded:

Stumpwork embroidery

Squirrel Needlebook stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Trapunto Tree with birds by Pat Bootland

Crewelwork

Detail 1 of Bag with Crewel Embroidery designed by Marjorie Gilby

Now sharing some quick notes on embroidery that has caught my eye recently:

The Great Tapestry of Scotland

This is a tapestry in the tradition of the Bayeux Tapestry – an epic account of Scottish history, wonderful design by artist Andrew Crummy and just awesome stitching.

Kate Davies has done a series of blog posts on this tapestry with great photos of the stitching here

Contemporary Australian Textile Artist – Meredith Woolnough

Meredith’s work is technically and aesthetically breathtaking – she combines embroidery, resin and other materials to create multi-layered and sculptural textile works. She’s having an exhibition from 5-31 July in the Pop Up Gallery at the Milk Factory, 33 Station St (rear), Bowral.

You can see examples of her work on her blog here

Bye for now

Carmen

 

Blackwork Beauties 2

Hi again

We had some lovely feedback from readers about Marjorie’s Blackwork cushion. So here are another two wonderful embroideries by Marjorie Gilby that include blackwork.

The first is a historic house ‘Ashgrove’ done in an elegant Blackwork style:

Ashgrove Blackwork by Marjorie Gilby

Close-up of Ashgrove Blackwork by Marjorie Gilby

The second is an equally elegant piece but with a hint of mystery. This portrait includes Cross Stitch, Blackwork and Beading:

Lady in Blackwork Coat by Marjorie Gilby

X stitch and Blackwork Woman in Coat by Marjorie Gilby

X stitch and Blackwork Lady by Marjorie Gilby

and here’s a closer look at the Blackwork panel

Xstitch and Blackwork Woman by Marjorie Gilby

Close-up of Blackwork Panel on Woman in Coat by Marjorie Gilby

If you want a more detailed look just click on the photos.

Thank you again Marjorie for so generously sharing your work with us.

Enjoy!

Carmen