Celebrating World Embroidery Day 2014

Hi everyone

Today’s World Embroidery Day – what are you doing to celebrate?

The concept of World Embroidery Day came from the Skane Branch of the Swedish Embroidery Guild (Broderiakademin). You can read more about them here

The Swedish Guild also wrote this inspiring Manifesto to go with World Embroidery Day

embroidery_manifesto_-english

Our Guild’s Celebrations

We emailed the Swedish Guild to find out how they celebrate World Embroidery Day and they wrote back saying that they go to cafes and stitch. So hey that’s what we did too!

Here are some of us at the retro and funky Bite to Eat cafe at Chifley this morning.

World Embroidery Day Balloons 2014

World Embroidery Day at Bite to Eat Chifley 2014

Here’s a peek at some of the stitchy goodness going on with all the chat and coffee.

Sandra Pollard was stitching this vintage piece

Detail of Vintage Embroidery stitched by Sandra Pollard

Leonie Hunt was also working on a vintage piece

Vintage Embroidery stitched by Leonie Hunt

and Jillian Farrer was chain stitching this piece with a real pop of colour

Chain Stitch Embroidery stitched by Jillian Farrer

We’re hoping to post some photos from the group who met at the Arboretum cafe on Facebook soon.

One of our members Tracey Kent couldn’t join us for the cafe fun but celebrated the day at her school – how awesome is that!

More Stitchy Goodness 

Now as a bonus to celebrate World Embroidery Day here are some lovely embellished and stitched surfaces.

Monica Andrew has just finished this creative and contemporary cushion featuring entrapped objects and an embellished surface

Entrapped objects cushion by Monica Andrew

Detail 1 of Entrapped Cushion by Monica Andrew

Detail 2 of  Entrapped objects Cushion by Monica Andrew

Detail 3 of Entrapped Objects Cushion by Monica Andrew

For a different kind of embellished embroidery here’s a delicate and too cute elephant softie stitched by Barbara Adams

Elephant Softie stitched by Barbara Adams

Detail 1 of Elephant Softie stitched by Barbara Adams

detail 2 of Elephant Softie stitched by Barbara Adams

Detail 3 of Elephant Softie stitched by Barbara Adams

Detail 4 of Elephant Softie stitched by Barbara Adams

If you’re a fan of Gary Clarke designs you’ll love this elegant entrapped organza piece stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Encased Organza Tulip stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Detail 1 of Encased Organza Tulip stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Detail 2 of Encased Organza Tulip stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Detail 3 of Encased Organza Tulip stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Agnes has also embellished this lovely painted canvas

Embellished Lady stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Detail1 of Embellished Lady stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Detail 2 of Embellished Lady stitched by Agnes Sciberras

Enjoy!

Carmen

News Update

Hi everyone

A quick note to say I’ve updated the following Members Galleries:

Bags & Purses 

Beadwork  

Canvaswork  

Crewel & Surface Stitchery

Cross Stitch

Hardanger

Japanese Techniques

Silk Ribbon

Stumpwork & Textured Stitching

Here’s a tiny taster of the photos I’ve added.

Detail of Dragonfly Needlecase stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Embroidered Bag

Detail 4 of Embroidered Cream Bag stitched by Marjorie Gilb

Hardanger

Hardanger Table Runner stitched by Meryl Fellows

Stumpwork

Guild’s Stumpwork Sample

cushion

Detail from Canvaswork Cushion with Blue Hen stitched by Bill Thorn

Detail of Bargello Cushion  stitched by Bill Thorn

Detail of Bargello Cushion stitched by Bill Thorn

Detail 5 of Camel Rug stitched by Yvonne Kingsley

Crewel embroidery stool

Detail of Crewel Stool stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Hope you enjoy the pics and have a great weekend!

Carmen

Sublime Needlework

Hi again

I’ve previously used the adjective sublime to describe the stumpwork of Lorna Loveland here. It’s not a word to be used lightly but it absolutely also applies to this exquisite piece of needlework stitched by Marjorie Gilby.

Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

History

This piece has a really interesting history. It’s a reproduction (with some variations) of a piece of Mountmellick designed and embroidered by Miss S. Docker around 1912-1913.

Marjorie got this design from the book Australian Heritage Needlework Wildflowers edited by Jennifer Sanders which includes a range of wonderful colonial and early twentieth century designs.

This particular design is The Waratah Tray Cloth and it was contributed by Ann – Marie Bakewell. For those readers who don’t live in Australia a Waratah is a spectacular native flower and the floral emblem of New South Wales.

25773254.Waratah

Mountmellick

Mountmellick is a type of Whitework embroidery with floral motifs that developed in the Irish town of Mountmellick around 1825. It uses predominantly knotted and padded stitches to create a richly textured surface. Traditionally it’s worked in a white matt thread on white cotton satin jean fabric.

Mountmellick was popular in Australia at the turn of the century for those household items that needed frequent washing. Whitework generally was also fashionable and the motifs used were often nationalistic and featured designs based on local wildflowers.

Marjorie’s Waratah Tray Cloth

This design has adapted the original design to surface embroidery using linen fabric and coton a broder.

Let’s have a closer look….

Waratah Tray Cloth 2 stitched by Marjorie Gilby

and closer again…….

Detail 1 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 2 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 7 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Detail 8 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

If you look at the main Waratah flower the central area is embroidered in Padded Satin Stitch. The petals are outlined in Stem Stitch and filled with needlelace in Sixteenth Lace Stitch.

Ann – Marie Bakewell notes that in researching the original embroidery by Miss Docker she found this stitch in the Encyclopedia of Needlework by Therese de Dillmont. This was one of the few embroidery reference books available in Australia when this piece would have been stitched.

What do you think of Sixteenth Lace Stitch? I’m just blown away by it and can’t wait to learn it.

Now to the Waratah bud….

Detail 3 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Again the central element is Padded Satin Stitch slanted at various angles. The petals are outlined in Stem Stitch and then filled with Laced Herringbone Stitch.

The centre spine of the leaf on the right is worked in Feather Stitch and the outline of the leaf in Crossed Buttonhole Stitch at right angles to the edge.

detail 5 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

In the large leaf above the long centre line is stitched in Slanted Buttonhole Stitch and surrounded with Seed Stitch. The outline is Indented Buttonhole Stitch.

The smaller leaf to the right in the above photo has Feather Stitch down the centre and Crossed Buttonhole Stitch along the outer edges.

detail 6 of Waratah Tray Cloth stitched by Marjorie Gilby

I was intrigued by these two leaves and the use of Oyster Chain Stitch (also called Knotted Cable Chain Stitch) to define the centre line of the top one – just awesome. The Sawtooth Buttonhole Stitch along the outline of this leaf is also incredibly effective.

Both these leaves have very clever placement of closed and open spaces to create shape and directional change.

The French Knots provide a delicate decorative effect.

Marjorie thank you so much for sharing this stunning needlework with us.

As you can tell I just adore this piece – hope you enjoy it too!

Have a great week!

Carmen

A Path to the Beach

Hi everyone

This post has some awesome eye candy.

From 31 May to 1 June the Guild ran a workshop led by the wonderful Glenys Leske from South Australia.

The aim was to create this delicate and lovely scene called Path to the Beach. It’s a richly layered and textured design.

Path-to-Beach-300x233

Over the coming weeks we hope to share some of the finished projects with you. The participants in the workshop have all added their own touch to the design.

We’re going to start today with Pat Bootland’s finished piece. Pat has very generously allowed her work to be photographed before it was framed – you can see the basting around the edges that hold the silk organza to the background  fabrics. This meant that Stewart Bath could photograph the work in all its detail.

Pat’s piece is full of exquisite stitching to create the features of this beachscape.  I love them all but I was especially taken by the simple but effective use of the frayed edges of fabric to evoke the spray of waves as they hit the beach.

Here’s the eye candy:

Walk to the Beach stitched by Pat Bootland

Detail 1 of Walk to the Beach stitched by Pat Bootland

Detail 2 of Walk to the Beach stitched by Pat Bootland

detail 3 of Walk to the Beach stitched by Pat Bootland

Detail 4 of Walk to the beach stitched by Pat Bootland

Detail 5 of Walk to the Beach stitched by Pat Bootland

Detail 6 of Walk to the Beach stitched by Pat Bootland

 

Enjoy!

Carmen

Looking Over Shoulders 7

Hi everyone

This time it’s the turn of the morning group. These photos were taken with my iPad at the last couple of meetings at Gorman House.

You have Julie Knight to thank for the fact that I’ve done these two recent Looking over Shoulders posts. She was wearing this very striking necklace and I asked her about it….

Necklace 1 by Julie Knight

Turns out she was so inspired by the Kim Thittichai Workshop (held at the Guild at the end of March) that she was experimenting with using Kim’s technique to bond embellished Vliesofix to leather and this necklace was the result. A-M-A-Z-I-N-G! So I had to share it with you…

I would never in a million years have guessed that this surface was Vliesofix – it looks like a hard plastic or resin. Kim has written an account of the workshops at our Guild here.

Julie is incredibly creative and productive and had made not one but three necklaces. Here are the other two:

Necklace 2 by Julie Knight

Necklace 3 by Julie Knight

When she wasn’t being asked to show her necklaces to people she was stitching the ladybug embroidery on this sweet baby dress

Pink Baby Dress with Ladybug stitched by Julie Knight

Irene Burton was putting the finishing touches to this doll dressed in very pretty Hardanger:

Hardanger Doll by Irene Burton

Like Julie she’s also incredibly productive and had these three crocheted bags sitting on the table beside her sewing kit:

Crocheted Bag2 by Irene Burton

Crocheted Bag 1 by Irene Burton

Crocheted Bag 3 by Irene Burton

Dimity Manton was also into crochet working away at this granny square:

Granny Square in Progress by Dimity Manton

Nearby Evelyn Foster was making up these Christmas squares that Helen Nastopoulus had stitched:

Xmas Squares stitched by Helen Nastopoulus

She was using this dainty needlecase machine stitched by her cousin.

photo 22

Kay Reid came back from her recent embroidery cruise all enthusiastic about Brazilian embroidery:

Brazilian Embroidery in progress stitched by Kay Reid

I couldn’t resist taking another photo of this lovely wool embroidery that Gail Haidon is working on:

Wool Embroidery of Hydrangeas stitched by Gail Haidon

Ann Lond was tatting this lace border for a vintage tablecloth to replace one that’s become too frayed:

Tatting by Ann Lond

She also had with her a large Chicken Scratch tablecloth that she’s embroidered for the Canberra branch of the Country Women’s Association. It was way too large to photograph so I focussed on these couple of elements:

Chicken Scratch Triangle by Ann Lond

Chicken Scratch Border by Ann Lond

At the other end of this table Louise Willey was stitching this celtic design in Canvaswork:

Celtic Design Canvaswork in progress by Louise Willey

Trish Hyland was chatting away to her and progressing this delicate Hardanger diamond:

Hardanger Diamond in Progress stitched by Trish Hyland

While Meryl Fellows was also stitching away at another one of her wonderful Hardanger pieces:

Hardanger in hoop stitched by Meryl Fellows

Jenny Clayton’s cute bullion scoops of ice cream on a baby’s onsie made me smile:

Bullion Ice cream on babygro stitched by Jenny Clayton

Beside her Janice Brennan was stitching the elements of another Diana Lampe design:

Diana Lampe design with Wattle stitched by Janice

The wattle tree really adds a pop of colour:

Wattle detail from Diana Lampe design stitched by Janice

And now for some cross stitch:

The big lazing cat that Joyce Lynch is embroidering is coming to life:

Cat x stitch in progress by Joyce Lynch

As is Doreen McGregor‘s butler:

Butler x stitch by Doreen McGregorMeanwhile Gwyneth Peddey was working on this imposing view of Harlech Castle.

Harlech Castle X stitch by Gwyneth Peddey

Enjoy!

Carmen

 

A Summer Parterre

Hi everyone

Hope you all had a great weekend.

Before we look at some wonderful stitching here are a couple of photos of our big move last Thursday:

Hackett Community Centre

Through that glass door is the Guild’s new home at Hackett Community Centre

Leaders truck arriving

Here’s the first truckload arriving

Christine in cupboard

Look who we found in one of the cupboards!

At the moment our new home at Hackett is just a sea of boxes, furniture etc and it’s going to take a huge effort to get everything sorted. So to help the settling in process go smoothly the morning and evening meetings that would have happened today have been cancelled – they start again next Monday 12 May.

The May meetings for Hardanger, Creative and Paper Arts and Young Stitchers have also been cancelled – we’re really sorry about this and looking forward to things getting back to normal in June.

A Summer Parterre

This is another exquisite piece from Marjorie Gilby. She created the design for a class with Pamela Watts in a technique called ‘scribble canvas’ in 1998. Just click on the photos if you want to look more closely.

Here’s the finished work framed

Canvaswork Summer Parterre by Marjorie Gilby

and some closer views

Unframed Canvaswork Summer Parterre Marjorie Gilby

Central Square of Summer Parterre by  Marjorie Gilby

This is specially for those of you who like to look closely at the stitching

Detail 4 from Summer Parterre by Marjorie Gilby

The green plant in the pot is done in needlelace. The pot is constructed of two metal rings each of which has been sewn over with Buttonhole stitch. These two rings were then laid on top of each other and stitched together.

The grey/beige ‘pebbles’ around the pot are French knots while the terracotta pavement is Cushion Stitch.

Detail of Summer Parterre by Marjorie Gilby

The flat blue and pink flowers are Rice Stitch. To create the waterlillies in the bottom left hand corner Marjorie first made needlelace leaves and then she used Cup Stitch to give dimensionality to the lily flowers.

Now you might remember Velvet Stitch (also called Turkey Stitch or Ghiordes Knot) from the blog post about Audrey’s extraordinary Aran style Canvaswork pillow here. It’s used to create a plush pile and here Marjorie has stitched it in green wool to create a box hedge for the parterre.

Tip

Here’s a tip that Pamela Watts passed on to Marjorie for creating a thick and even pile – use an eyebrow brush to shape and fluff up the pile after you’ve cut off the top of the loops.

Detail 3 of Summer Parterre by Marjorie Gilby

The other feature flower that’s repeated in the geometric design of this piece is made with Bullions and then set off with needlelace leaves. The surrounding triangle in mauves and pinks is done in Algerian eyelets. The small mauve and yellow ground cover flowers within the box hedges are French Knots.

Detail 2 from Summer Parterre by Marjorie Gilby

To create the shaped Cumquat trees Marjorie first made pompoms and then clipped them into a ball shape and added beads for fruit.

The texture, geometry and dimensionality created by all these different stitches is just awesome. My favourite feature is the terracotta pot and plant in the centre of the piece. Do you have a favourite feature?

Marjorie – a heartfelt thanks again for sharing your wonderful pieces with us.

Take care

Carmen

 

News Update

Hi everyone

A quick newsy post.

We’re Moving on 1 May

Mega news – on 1 May we’re moving from Gorman House to 100 Maitland St in Hackett. There’ll be no Monday morning or evening meetings on 5 May because we’ll still be unpacking. Our first meeting at the new premises will be on 12 May.

As you can imagine this issue has been taking up a huge amount of the Committee’s time and energy for the last nine months. We’ll all breathe a huge sigh of relief when the move happens. Here’s crossing fingers, toes and everything else that it all goes smoothly.

Threads for sale

We’ve been contacted by Belinda Jessup a local textile artist to say that she has some threads for sale on her blog here. Belinda says that all these threads were bought before 1996.

Update of Members Gallery

The following galleries have been updated. The newest photos are at the top of each gallery.

Bags & Purses

Beadwork

Challenges

Contemporary Creative

Crewel & Surface Stitchery

Cross Stitch

Stumpwork & Textured Stitching

Whitework

Here’s a trailer of a scissors keep stitched by Marjorie Gilby that’s now on the Crewel and Surface Stitchery Gallery

Bee scissorskeep

Bee Scissorskeep stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Scissorskeeper

Bee Detail from Scissorskeeper stitched by Marjorie Gilby

Free Canvaswork Design

If you love doing Canvaswork you might want to have a look at this free Boxed Heart pattern

boxedheart

which you can download here

Take care

Carmen

A Lovely Surprise

Hello everyone

Hope you’ve all had a great weekend. Sunny and warm here today so we could forget that the days are getting cooler and Winter’s coming. All a bit surreal given that my family in North Queensland are dealing with Cyclone Ita and torrential rain.

We have an open invitation to members of the Guild to bring their work in to be photographed for the Members Gallery. So when I go to the Guild on a Monday there’s always a certain amount of anticipation because you never know what might turn up.

And this happened a couple of weeks ago when Audrey Schultz, one of our longstanding members, opened a bag and said to me ‘Carmen do you think these cushions would be of any interest?’. She then pulled out two cream cushions with a highly textured wool surface and covered in the most intense and intricate stitching.

They are needlepoint cushions and the designs are inspired by the traditional knit patterns of the Aran Islands. If you’re a knitter you’ll know that there’s currently a huge revival in traditional knitting styles and Ravelry (the online knit and crochet community) has hundreds of entries for ‘Aran’.

Cream Cushion in Aran Style

The design for the Cream Cushion comes from a pattern Aran Needlepoint by Cindy Lee Arbelbide that was published in 1979 by Leisure Arts. Contrary to popular mythology Aran knitting as we know it emerged in Ireland in the 1930s and reached an export peak in the 1950s and 60s. It’s a fascinating story of canny marketing and women’s history. If you want to know more there’s a great post by Kate Davies here

Now back to Audrey’s cushion…..

You can see in this photo one of the central concepts of Aran designs – a symmetrical pattern around a central axis.

Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

Now to the stitching for those of you who like to have a close look at the surface stitching:

Corner Detail of Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

Here there’s a Rosette Centre surrounded by squares in Fern Stitch and Double Cross Stitch Variation covering 6 threads.  The linear elements around the squares include Basketweave Stitch, Buttonhole Half-Moons, Wheat Stitch, Upright Cross Stitch, Half and Half Stitch, Oblong Stitch and Double Leviathan Stitch.

The next square is even more technical……it has a Ribbed Spider Centre and the squares around it are worked in Wheat Stitch with Upright Cross Stitch, then Woven Plait Stitch, Fern Stitch, Knotted Stitch, Continental Stitch and Buttonhole Half and Three-Quarter Moons.

Centre Square of Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

A small Rosette element  where you can get a good view of the Buttonhole Half-Moons, the Wheat Stitch (looks like a wheat sheaf) and the Flat Squares with a French Knot filling each centre.

Detail 1 of Cream Aran Cushion by Audrey Schultz

Here’s another square with Large and Small Ribbed Spider Stitches.

Detail 2 of Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

This square has a Rose Centre worked in Rose Stitch…….

Detail 3 of Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

These next two photos are eye candy for you…..

Detail 4 of Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

Detail 5 of Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

Brown and Cream Cushion

I don’t have any information about the provenance of this cushion’s design and thought you might just like to look at the richly textured surface…..the stitches are traditional canvaswork elements with less complexity and intricacy than those in the Cream Cushion.

But there are a couple of special stitches – the brown squares are done in Rhodes Stitch while that square of stitched wool with a pile that makes you want to touch it is done in the appropriately named Velvet Stitch. Audrey says that to create this effect you stitch loops over knitting needles and then cut the top of the loop away to get the thick pile.

Audrey’s execution of these stitches is exquisite and masterful – soooo inspiring!

Cream and Brown Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

Centre Square of Brown and Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

Detail 1 of Brown and Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

Brown and Cream Aran Cushion stitched by Audrey Schultz

Writing this blog post has given me a deep appreciation of Audrey’s talent and her mastery of Canvaswork.

Just awesome Audrey and thank you so much for sharing these lovely treasures with us.

Thanks also to Stewart Bath for the photos that let us look so closely at the surface stitching.

Enjoy!

Carmen

 

Sublime Stumpwork 4

Well everyone here’s the post I know a lot of people have been hanging out for – the second   exquisite and utterly beautiful Jane Nicholas mirror by Lorna Loveland.

Again Lorna’s extraordinary talent needs no input from me ……

Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 in frame stitched by Lorna Loveland

Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 Unfamed and Stitched by Lorna Loveland

Owl and Fly from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Owl from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Yellow Fly and Green Buds from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Yellow Fly from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Pinwheel Flower from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Clover from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Thistle from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Dragonfly from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Rust Flower from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Hive and Hedgehog from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Spider and Hedgehog from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Hive and Bees from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Salmon Needlewoven Flower from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Bee and Fig from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Strawberries from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

Viola Flower from Jane Nicholas Mirror 2 stitched by Lorna Loveland

This wonderful piece brings to mind the line from John Keats

‘A thing of beauty is a joy forever’

What do you think?

Carmen

News Update

Just a quick note to say I’ve updated the following galleries. The new work is at the top of the each gallery:

Bags and Purses

Beadwork

Blackwork

Casalguidi

Challenges

Contemporary Embroidery

Crewel and Surface Stitchery

Cross Stitch

Goldwork

Samplers

Whitework

Enjoy!

Carmen