Stitching Delights in Melbourne

I had a few days in Melbourne recently, and had to share with you some delightful stitching experiences.

The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria – open day

It happened that the Guild was having an open day at Embroidery House in Malvern, so how could I resist?

Embroidery House 1 VicEmbroidery House 2 VicEmbroidery House 3 VicEmbroidery House 4 Vic

I’m sure that embroiderers anywhere would be thrilled to have such a wonderful creative environment!  Once I had overcome my envy, I was made very welcome by President Anne and other members, and joined the throng of visitors to admire the demonstrations of different machine and hand embroidery techniques.  As seems to be the case with embroiderers everywhere, members were busy generously sharing their enthusiasm and knowledge, and here is just a small sample:

Machine embroidery  Embroidery House 7 Vic

 

Embroidery House 6 Vic

 

 

 

 

 

 

Embroidery House 5 Vic

Sandra Warren Smith introduced me to the delights of Lefkara Embroidery, which is a traditional embroidery technique from Cyprus also known as Lefkara Lace, or Lefkaritika.  Mmm, will have to investigate this one further, starting here.

 

 

 

 

Embroidery House 9 VicSandra told me that books on this technique are few and far between, so here is one by Androula Hadjiyiasemi.  I will be checking our own Guild’s library, plus those talented members who do Hardanger and all kinds of drawn thread, needlelace etc..

 

 

 

 

 

I had to tear myself away, but not before buying a couple of things from the book sale (you can never have too many embroidery books).   On the way out, I noticed that even the doorplates have embroidery, sigh.   If you’d like to find out more about The Embroiderers Guild,Victoria, Australia, click here.

Embroidery House 8 Vic


Then it was on to the National Gallery of Victoria, for the exhibition Exquisite Threads: English Embroidery 1600s – 1900s, showcasing examples of English domestic and professional embroidery from the NGV’s own collection, plus from private collectors, the National Gallery of Australia, the Melbourne Diocesan Historical Commission, and members of The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria.  Non-flash photography allowed, yippee!

Exquisite Threads 3Exquisite Threads 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Used for apprentice embroiderers to learn stitches, as recording of stitches and patterns for domestic embroidery, then an important part of the education of young women, samplers in the exhibition dated from 1692 to 1932.

Exquisite Threads 5

Sorry about the quality of my photo of this Wessex embroidery sampler, completed by Margaret Foster in 1932, but I couldn’t resist the opportunity to digress into mentioning our Guild’s classes on WESSEX STITCHERY with Annette Dziedzic.

Wessex Stitchery

Please note that the dates have been changed for this class, now on 11 and 25 July, with preparation on 6 July, but keep checking our web site here any time you would like to check out our classes schedule.  I hear that Robyn Duncan, our Classes Co-ordinator, already has an exciting list of internal and external tutors coming up for 2016.

But back to the exhibition.

Exquisite Threads 1Exquisite Threads 2

 

 

Here we have a Privy Councillor’s uniform from 1939, and an ecclesiastical cope made in 1853.

 

 

 

 

Exquisite Threads 6 Exquisite Threads 7 Exquisite Threads 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A waistcoat from the 1770’s, an evening cape circa 1924, and a pelisse and dress circa 1818.

 

Exquisite Threads 9 Writing box, circa 1665

 

 

 

 

 

I’m thrilled to bits with the book from the exhibition, which gives background details of the items, embroidery history from different periods, and close-up photographs showing beautiful detail.  I believe that this exhibition will not be touring, but will be on at the NGV International until 12 July, so if you can get there, it’s well worth a visit – see the details here.


Then I had to go back to the NGV International, to see A Golden Age of China, Quianlong Emperor, 1736-1795.  On loan from the Palace Museum, Beijing, it included a selection of magnificent items from the collections of this emperor, and it was truly wonderful to be able to see both front and back of silk embroidered robes.

Emperor’s ceremonial court robe Qing dynasty, Quianlong period 1736-95 silk satin The Palace Museum, Beijing (Gu42311)

No photos were allowed in this exhibition, but once again the book gives excellent information and photography.  Sadly, this exhibition finished on 21 June, but you can see more information here.


You thought I was finished?  No way, read on…

Then it was off to the Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries Costume Exhibition, at Rippon Lea House and Gardens, the National Trust property that is used as Aunt Prudence’s house in the TV series.  People who are especially interested in the costumes for this series, based on the novels by Kerry Greenwood, will know that Marion Boyce, costume designer, and Every Cloud Productions, use collected vintage items to re-create the fashion fantasies of the late 1920’s.

Miss Fisher 1Miss Fisher 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miss Fisher 3Miss Fisher 5Miss Fisher 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miss Fisher 4

Fans of the TV show will recognise these outfits from the latest series.  There was also a behind the scenes workroom exhibit, showing how costumes were constructed, and genuine 1920’s accessories, part of Marion Boyce’s personal collection.

Miss Fisher 7Miss Fisher 8

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, of course there is a book with detailed descriptions and gorgeous photos.  But then it was time for afternoon tea, still in 1920’s character, in the stable building.

Miss Fisher 9

You’re in luck if you need time to get to this one, as it’s on until 30 September 2015, and will tour to other cities.  For more information, click here.


And the WW1 Centenary Exhibition, on at the Melbourne Museum until 16 August, details here.

IWM 1More uniform goldwork.

 

 

 

 

IWM 2Would you believe this is made of paper?

IWM 4IWM 3

Ambulance officer uniform, and detail


Finally, the Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne, open all year, including the museum beneath, details here.

Shrine 1

There are textiles everywhere, including this copy of the Battle of Britain lace, circa 1942-47.

Shrine 2 Battle of Britain LaceShrine 3 Battle of Britain Lace

I’m sure I could have found more stitching delights, but only had a few days, and needed to come home for a rest!

Gail

Looking over shoulders 12

Hello everyone

It’s time for another blog post.  I’ve been slow to get up to speed, but that doesn’t mean that our Guild members haven’t been as busy and creative as ever.

Creative Stitches by Edith John

 

Judy Barton Browne was inspired by this book (available from the Guild library), to have a play with stitches, and create this sampler.

How many different “basic” stitches can you spot?  Look closely, and you can see where she has varied a stitch to give a different effect.

 

 

 

Stitch sampler by Judy Barton-Brown, detail1Stitch sampler by Judy Barton-Brown, detail2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stitch sampler by Judy Barton-Brown, detail3Stitch sampler by Judy Barton-Brown, detail3

 

So go on, start playing with stitches!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shona Phillips has created this happy little doll, and the brooches surrounding it are just some of the 90 brooches she was creating to give to all the female residents of a local aged care facility.  Shona didn’t want anyone to miss out on Mother’s Day, so she was powering along.  What a lovely thought!

 

Doll and brooches1 by Shona PhillipsDoll and brooches2 by Shona Phillips

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret Lamond was doing some experimentation, inspired by this book (also available in the Guild library), to create some stunning metal machine embroideries.  There was a bit of impromptu consultation around the table at a Monday meeting regarding colours to be used next.

 

The Art of Stitching on Metal by Ann ParrStitching on metal1 by Margaret LamondStitching on metal2 by Margaret Lamond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandra Pollard‘s work in progress is a Semco linen vintage cloth, in which the areas have been coloured in using Hobbytex.  Sandra has decided to use Minnamurra threads in a different, and softer, colour palette, and her plans include having some cut out sections in the finished cloth.

Vintage Semco linen cloth by Sandra Pollard

Vintage Semco linen cloth detail by Sandra PollardVintage Semco linen cloth threads by Sandra Pollard

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quilted panel by Andrea Moore

Quilted panel by Andrea Moore

 

 

Andrea Moore‘s quilted panel is from a Helen Godden workshop, and incorporates fabric paint, appliqué, and free motion machine quilting.

 

 

 

 

 

Gloria Loughman‘s quilted panel comes from a workshop she attended in Fiji, and incorporates hand painting, Visofix and free motion machine quilting.  Don’t you think that the little village is lovely?  Gloria intends to add more embellishment.

Quilted panel by Gloria LoughmanQuilted panel detail by Gloria Loughman

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s all for now, happy stitching!

Gail

Looking over Shoulders 11

Hi everyone

Hope you’ve had a good week & have set aside some special time for yourself over the weekend.

Next Monday the Guild’s weekly meetings will start up again so I thought you might like to see the pics I took of people’s work during the last morning meeting for 2014. Believe it or not this is only  a sample of all the stitchy goodness that was going on. The photos were taken with my phone so they’re not up to Stewart Bath’s wonderful standard but hopefully they’ll be good enough to give you an idea of the work.

I’m going to share the work with in the order that I took the photos.

This is an epic post so grab a cuppa or glass of wine and a comfy chair…….and here we go………

In the front room Ann Lond was working on this Hardanger cream square

Hardanger Cream Square in progress stitched by Anne Lond

Maddalena Gustin is trying her hand at Hardanger under Bonnie Crawford‘s careful guidance. Here’s the piece she was working on

Hardanger Diamond in progress stitched by Magda Gustin

Bonnie herself was working on this cream and blue rectangular piece

Hardanger Blue and White Runner stitched by Bonnie Crawford

Avis Gesling’s Hardanger had a pop of colour in aqua and mauve

Hardanger Acqua and Mauve Piece in progress stitched by Avis Gesling

Detail 1 of Hardanger Acqua and Mauve Piece in Progress stitched by Avis Gesling

While Elizabeth Hooper was having fun stitching some purple hearts

Hardanger Purple Heart Piece in progress stitched by Elizabeth Hooper

Detail 1 of Hardnager Purple Heart Piece in Progress stitched by Elizabeth Hooper

Now something completely different – a Goldwork dragon being stitched by Pat Bootland 

Dragon Goldwork in Progress by Pat Bootland

Detail 1 of Dragon Goldwork by Pat Bootland

Across the table Carol Van Gelder was having fun working on this too cute wool blanket with monkeys

Wool Blanket with Monkeys in progress stitched by Carol Van GelderNear her Lesley Fusinato was finishing this Canvaswork Christmassy house

Canvaswork Xmas House in Progress stitched by Lesley Fusinato

and Floriana Basilisco‘s tapestry was also getting some finishing touches

Tapestry Fish in Progress by Floriana Basilisco

Lesley Jemesen had a lovely Hardanger runner in her hoop

Hardanger in Hoop stitched by Lesley Jemesen

While Evelyn Foster was stitching a vintage embroidery

Vintage Embroidery in Progress stitched by Evelyn Fosterand Helen Nastopoulos had a cross stitch underway

Cross Stitch in Progress stiched by Helen Nastopoulos

In the room down the corridor Margaret Cooper was working on this piece

Cross Stitch Horse in Progress stitched by Margaret CooperKathy Pascoe had a bright Janlynn wallhanging underway

Blue Cross Stitch Wallhanging in Progress stitched by Kathy Pascoe

and Gwynyth Peddey had made amazing progress with Harlech Castle since we last saw it

Harlech Castle Cross Stitch in Progress by Gwynyth Peddey

Margaret O’Beirne was working on an intriguing Macedonian style embroidery from a class with Alison Snepp

Macedonian Style Embroidery in Progress stitched by Margaret OBeirne

While Gail Haidon was cross stitching these fun owls that just make you smile

Cross Stitch Owls in Progress by Gail Haidon

and Jan Hure was working on a very different kind of bird – a gorgeous Or Nue Superb Parrot from last year’s class with Pat Bootland

Or Nue Superb Parrot in Progress by Jan Hure

 Libby Williams was hand stitching this quilt with appliqué in felted wool

Quilt with Applique in Progress by Libby Williams

Detail of Applique from Quilt by Libby Williams

Back in the front room Janice Brennan was crocheting

Crochet by Janice Brennan

Janice also showed us a cool granny blanket she’d made during Show & Tell which got a huge response to its awesomeness. This detail doesn’t do it justice but at least it gives you an idea of its beauty

Detail of Crochet Rug by Janice Brennan

Trish Hyland was stitching some elegant Hardanger

Hardanger Diamond in Progress stitched by Trish Hyland This Happiness Quilt by Anne Dowling got lots of oohs and aaahs at Show & Tell

Happiness Quilt made by Anne Dowling

Cecilia Skene was upcycling curtain fabric to create these awesome needlecases for her granddaughters

Needlecase in Progress by Cecilia Skene

Needlecase 2 in Progress by Cecilia Skene

Needlecase 3 in Progress by Cecilia Skene

Needlecases 4 in Progress by Cecilia Skeneand adding a scissors fob for each one

Scissors Fob by Cecilia Skene

This Canvaswork by Judy Barton Browne has a real pop of colour

Canvaswork stitched by Judy Barton Browne

Detail 1 of Canvaswork by Judy Barton Browne

Another vibrant piece was this Book Cover designed by Luba Tomaska. Luba’s doing the Stitch a Month classes and this is her sampler of stitches in progress.

Sampler Book Cover in Progress by Luba Tomaska And last but not least is this amazing Or Nue Zebra design being stitched by Lorna Loveland also from the class with Pat Bootland

Or Nue Zebra in Progess by Lorna Loveland

Detail 1 of Or Nue Zebra in Progress by Lorna Loveland

Would you believe it’s her first Or Nue embroidery!

Enjoy!

Carmen